CEC Core Curriculum and CLEP Information

Middle School Literature and Composition

The philosophy of the English department is to present the full curriculum of literature, vocabulary, and composition from a Christian worldview. Grammar is offered in the middle school classes of English 6 and English 7.

Spelling is not included except in the correction of class work and compositions.

Middle School English

Middle School English 6 is a combination of grammar, literature and composition taught from a Biblical world view.  The Abeka grammar and literature curriculum, as well as various literary selections, will be covered.  The curriculum used for this course is Abeka.

The 7th grade level focuses on a mastery of grammar. All the major parts of speech are covered through the A Beka curriculum, including diagrams.

Middle School English 8 shifts the focus to literature and the fundamentals of composition with an introduction to the research paper. As with the high school classes, the Prentice Hall series is used in literature. Students who complete this class are well prepared for the high school level.

English 9 Literature and Composition (9th grade)

This course will focus on the fundamentals of writing utilizing a portfolio of academic and creative writing, including a research paper. Utilizing the Prentice Hall World Literature text, the literature will be an overview of major epics and writings, taught from a Christian world view.

English 10 Literature and Composition (10th grade)

Students will analyze classic novels and plays, and develop both creative and academic writing skills, culminating in a research paper and oral presentation. Classic novels and plays include Shakespeare, Huck Finn, and To Kill a Mockingbird. Quarterly Reader’s Journal and writing portfolio are required.

High School Literature and Composition/Honors-CLEP Level (Grades 11-12)

The upper high school English classes are offered in a two year literature rotation format in which grades 11-12 are integrated in the same English class. Each class is taught from a Christian world view which encompasses a complete overview of literature with an emphasis on Christian authors where applicable. Upon completion of high school, students will have an advanced knowledge of British and American literature. In addition, advanced students have the opportunity to take the CLEP test for college credit at the completion of the class at IWU or other college campuses for potential dual credit (high school and college). A number of students have successfully taken these CLEP tests over the years.

English Composition encompasses aspects of expository, business, and creative writing. The composition assignments are given in conjunction with the literature being studied. Students learn not only to write, but to correct their own work and to critique other student’s compositions in order to learn the writing process. An indexed portfolio organizes the student’s creative output over the course of his/her high school career. Each year students will write essays, a research paper, and an oral presentation on the research paper topic. The research paper will be written using the MLA style and will vary in length according to the student’s grade level (10-14 pages).

The Reader’s Journal is the last integral part of the High School English curriculum at CEC. Each quarter the student will read at least one book that pertains to the literature being studied that year. Then at the end of the quarter the journal is checked and students share about their selection in class. This practice contributes to the student’s classical reading, improves SAT scores, and improves their writing skills by reading excellent literature.

CLEP

In the English classes, students have the option to take the CLEP test in American Literature, British Literature, and Analyzing Literature. Students are also able to use their portfolio of compositions to place out of freshman composition classes at some universities, take a Dual Credit course in conjunction with Boyce College or take the AP language examination.

Senior Advanced Literature and Composition - Dual Credit

The Senior English class Dual Credit Option offers in a two-year literature rotation format which alternates American and British Literature. Each class is taught from a Christian world view which encompasses a complete overview of literature with an emphasis on Christian authors where applicable. Upon completion of high school, students will have an advanced knowledge of British and American literature. In addition, advanced students have the opportunity to take the CLEP test for college credit at the completion of the class at IWU or other college campuses for potential dual credit (high school and college). A number of students have successfully taken these CLEP tests over the years. Students have also scored well on the Analyzing Literature CLEP test which covers a knowledge of Literary Rhetorical Devices and how to utilize them in context.

The Dual Credit Composition element of the class follows the composition assignments of the Boyce College classes EN101 and EN102. Meeting during the regular CEC time schedule, students will complete a narration paper, an example paper, a cause/effect paper, and a comparison/contrast paper during the first semester to fulfill the EN101 credit. The development of the writing process with brainstorming, outlines, multiple drafts, and peer review are an integral part of the class.

During second semester, students will write a 12-14 page research paper with multiple sources, present a PowerPoint oral presentation, and complete a book review to fulfill the requirements of the EN102 credit.

In this class, as well as any CEC Dual Credit class, student may take this for high school credit only or, if they qualify, they may take the dual credit option for the additional college credit.

The Reader’s Journal is the last integral part of the High School English curriculum at CEC. Each quarter the student will read at least one book that pertains to the literature being studied that year. Then at the end of the quarter the journal is checked and students share about their selection in class. This practice contributes to the student’s classical reading, improves SAT scores, and improves their writing skills by reading excellent literature.

Math 7/6; Math 8/7; Algebra ½; Algebra 1; Algebra 2; Geometry; Pre-Calculus; Calculus

Math classes at CEC provide students with excellence in core curriculum and many choices for electives. The Saxon Math Curriculum is used in all core math classes. Saxon offers a time-tested spiral curriculum that builds incrementally, concept upon concept. Small classes, frequent evaluation, partnering with parents with lessons divided into daily assignments, and continuity of instruction throughout the curriculum, allow students to advance seamlessly through their entire school career, reinforcing not only math concepts as they are introduced but also applications of abstract ideas.

Placement Testing

Since success of each student is the ultimate goal, mandatory placement tests are offered for $30 per person, made payable to CEC, (dates and times scheduled with the Lori Hertrick - see Math Placement Page for more information) for all incoming students, enabling the instructors to determine the best fit for each student as they enter CEC. These tests are offered during the spring and summer. See the ACADEMICS/Math testing dates section of this website for the current test schedule.

Contemporary Mathematics/Dual Credit

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA if taking for dual credit through Boyce  and CEC Algebra 2 or passed the placement test. This course will cover Geometry, advanced Algebra concepts, finance, data analysis, and  Trigonometry with an emphasis on problem solving and practical applications.

Geometry - Cathy Wills —NEW—

Prerequisite: Algebra 1. This course will employ the text Geometry: Seeing, Doing, Understanding by Harold R. Jacobs which emphasizes Euclidean geometry and explains the importance of logical reasoning and proof in mathematics.

Personal Finance/Dual Credit

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA if taking for dual credit through IWU. This course applies biblical principles & real life practical applications to financial decision-making. Students will develop a financial plan for spending, investment, and risk management.

The CEC math placement test is not required for the following math classes:

SAT / ACT Math Preparation

CEC offers an ACT/SAT Prep class, which uses the Cambridge Educational Services materials and offers many chances to study and to take SAT and ACT practice tests. In addition, test-taking skills are reviewed.

Consumer Math

Addressing the need for practical financial information, CEC offers Dave Ramsey's Financial Peace for the Next Generation. Based on Ramsey’s principles for financial peace and independence, the course introduces high school students to the following concepts: savings, investing, retirement, debt, insurance, consumer buying habits, and real estate. Accompanied by a video series, students will review and practice day-to-day applications of these financial truths.

Science classes are all taught from the foundation of a Christian world view. Each class is structured from the truth of the Creation account in Genesis; however, the theory of evolution is explained in order for students to understand both sides of the controversy.

All Science classes include labs except for the Origins class which is a science elective. A lab is conducted in each class either bi-monthly or bi-quarterly. There is a science lab fee for each science class, listed under Academics/Required textbooks.

Science 6 and 7

Science 6 and 7 provide an introduction to earth science and life science for those without a knowledge of pre-algebra.

General Science, Physical Science, Biology, Chemistry, Physics

The General Science classes through Physics are taught exclusively from the Jay Wile Apologia curriculum.

Origins

The Origins class is offered every other year. It is an advanced high school science elective class that compares and contrasts Creationism, Intelligent Design, and Evolution.

This will prepare the serious science student for the apologetic arguments he/she will face at the college level. There is no lab in this class.

Marine Biology

Utilizing the Apologia text, this class is a "hands on-look" at aquatic life, complete with lab.

CSI: Forensic Science

This is a forensic science course for high school students that focuses on practices and analysis of physical evidence found at crime scenes. The text is a Kendall Hunt publication written by Barbara Ball-Deslich. Pre-requisite: none.

Advanced Chemistry

This advanced class is a continuation of Chemistry 1 utilizing the Apologia Advanced Chemistry text.

Anatomy/Biology 2

This class will explore human anatomy as outlined in Jay Wile and Marilyn Shannon's textbook Human Body: Fearfully and Wonderfully Made. Topics covered will include but are not limited to the following organ systems: Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscle, Nervous, Endocrine, Circulatory, Digestive, and Respiratory Systems. The focus will be on human anatomy with physiology and not comparative anatomy.

Advanced Physics - Bill Speicher —NEW—

Prerequisite: Calculus or currently enrolled in Calculus. Using the ‘gold standard’ text, Fundamentals of Physics, by Halliday and Resnick, students will cultivate their understanding of this calculus-based physics class as they explore mechanics, waves, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, optics, and special relativity. Students have the option of taking the AP Physics exam.

The Social Sciences include the following: Ancient/Modern World History, American History, World Geography, U.S. Government/Current Affairs. All the social science classes are taught from a Biblical worldview. For example, the Genesis account of creation with Adam and Eve is taught as the beginning of civilization, and time is measured in B.C. and A. D. in order to recognize the centrality of Jesus Christ and His finished work on the cross as the most important event in history.

Students learn critical thinking skills, learn to take notes, and participate in group activities.  For homework students may complete current events articles, timelines, map assignments, as well as complete text question assignments and a unit test that encompasses objective questions as well as essays.

High School social science classes will prepare students to take the CLEP examination for college credit.

Middle School History: Part 1 (grades 6-7)

The Middle School History class is a survey of ancient world history that covers Creation to the Industrial Revolution. Utilizing a middle school Bob Jones curriculum, the class is taught from a Christian world view. Some of the activities involved in the class include the following: text readings, workbook, videos, tests, projects.

Middle School History: Part 2 (grades 7-8)

The advanced middle school history class is a survey of modern world history that covers the Industrial Revolution through 21st Century. Utilizing a middle school Bob Jones curriculum, the class is taught from a Christian perspective. Some of the activities in the class are as follows: text readings, workbook, videos, tests, projects.

Middle School American History (grades 7-8)

Surveys American history using a narrative approach that includes discussions of major historical themes/events, people, geography, and the relevance of history in our modern world.

World Geography (grades 8-10)

Surveys the physical, political, and social geography of the six inhabited continents of the world (plus, Antarctica).  Introduction to high school level note-taking, class discussion (e.g., current events/issues), workbook activities, videos, research project.  A high school level curriculum is utilized, making this class eligible for high school credit.

World Geography (grades 8-10) is both a middle school and high school class.

History / Honor-CLEP Level (Grades 9-12)

The high school history classes are offered in a four year rotation format in which grades 9-12 are integrated in the same history class. Each class is taught from a Christian world view which encompasses a complete overview of history. Upon completion of high school, students will have an advanced knowledge of World History and American History. Students learn to take notes, participate in class discussion and group work, view videos, and participate in group oral presentations. Students work on maps, time lines and current events, as well as Scripture analysis on historical topics that relate to class discussion. In addition, advanced students have the opportunity to take the CLEP test for college credit at the completion of the class at IWU or other college campus for potential dual credit (high school and college). A number of students have successfully taken these CLEP tests over the years.

United States Government/Current Affair/Honors- CLEP Level (Grades 11-12)

The Government/Current Affairs class is taught utilizing the classic MacGruder’s American Government text covering the three branches of government, elections, media, and civil rights. For the Current Affairs segment of the class, students will complete short papers on topics in the news, as well as follow the fall elections. The U. S. Government class will include the following activities: mock elections, informal debates, role play of the U. S. Cabinet, Congress, and a mock trial.

At the conclusion of the class, students will have the option to take the CLEP American Government examination or the AP Government examination for dual college credit.

Health and Fitness Training (9-12th grades) - Sandy Shepard —NEW—

The course satisfies the Kentucky Department of Education’s requirements for health (½ credit) and physical education (½ credit). Students will develop their own fitness plan to incorporate healthy eating and exercise into their daily lives.

A College-Level Examination Program® Overview

The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) helps students earn credit for what they already know, regardless of how that knowledge was acquired. By receiving a satisfactory score on a CLEP exam, students can earn up to 12 college credits toward a college degree, depending on the exam subject and the policy of the college.

CLEP exams test mastery of college-level material acquired in a variety of ways—through general academic instructions, significant independent study, or extracurricular work. CLEP exam-takers include adults just entering or returning to school, military service members, and traditional-age college students.

More than six million CLEP exams have been administered since the program was launched in 1967. Today:

  • More than 1,400 colleges in the U.S. and overseas administer CLEP exams.
  • Nearly 3,000 colleges and universities have credit-granting and/or placement policies for CLEP.
Why CLEP?

Students engaged in the CLEP program:

  • Outperform students taking the introductory course by approximately one-half of a grade point.
  • Have a higher number of hours per semester than the students who take the comparable course.
  • Are as likely, or significantly more likely, to graduate than their non-CLEP-earning peers.

Learn more about the tests including how to:

  • Help students register and prepare for CLEP exams.
  • Become a test center and administer tests.
  • Order free materials and learn ways to promote your test center.
  • Interpret students' score information.

1 Moulder, B., Abdulla, A., and Moore, D. (2005) Validity and Fairness of CLEP Exams. College Board Research Notes RN-22 (New York: The College Board).
2 Scammacca, N., and Dodd, B. (2005). An Investigation of Outcomes for Students Who Earn Credit through the College-Level Examination Program. College Board Research Report No. 2005-5 (New York: The College Board).

For more general information about the CLEP go to www.collegeboard.com/CLEP

Year at a Glance

2017 EVENT
1/3 Begin Second Semester
3/1 Third Quarter Ends
3/7 Fourth Quarter Starts
3/23 Spring Dance for 9-10th grades at Kye’s 2 Ballroom, Jeffersonville, Ind.
3/24 Open House, IWU, Louisville campus
4/13 Spring Gala, Owl Creek CC
4/21-22 Spring Performance of Drama and Choir at Gingerwoods
4/28 Junior-Senior Prom, Wildwood CC
5/10 Last Day of Classes
5/17 Graduation at Southeast Christian Church (new location!)
5/16-17 Achievement Testing
8/21 Prayer Walk / Orientation
8/22 First Day of School
10/11 End of First Semester
10/17 Second Quarter Starts
11/21-22 Thanksgiving Break
12/13 Second Quarter Ends; last day of classes before Christmas break
2018 EVENT
1/9 Begin second Semester
2/20-21 Winter Break
3/7 End of Third Quarter
3/13 Start of Fourth Quarter
4/3-4 Spring Break
5/16 End of Fourth Quarter; last day of classes